Black Sheep Press

Tuesday, March 28, 2006

Alberta sees jump in population.

Statistics Canada says Alberta's population expanded by more than five times the national average during the last three months of 2005 -- a growth that has been unsurpassed since the oil boom of 1979-1980.

Later down in the article this 'revelation' is revealed

Meanwhile the four Atlantic provinces, Saskatchewan, the Yukon and the Northwest Territories recorded a decrease in population.

I think we all know where these people went.

Sunday, March 26, 2006

Today's apocalyptic, end-of-the-world, oh my god, oh my god, global warming story brought to you by CNN

From heat waves to storms to floods to fires to massive glacial melts, the global climate seems to be crashing around us.

Maybe I am wrong to not be all that concerned about global warming, but over-the-top fearmongering such as this isn't likely going to change my opinion.

Thursday, March 23, 2006

Someone doesn't quite know their Canadian history

The fact that all the so-called Liberal "star" candidates (e.g. Brian Tobin, John Manley, Frank McKenna) have chosen not to seek the leadership pretty well tells you they understand the next Liberal leader could possibly become the first Liberal leader ever not to become Canada's PM at some point.


That honour already goes to Edward Blake over one hundred years ago who was the first and only Liberal leader to never become PM.

Thursday, March 16, 2006

Martin to resign

Paul Martin to step down as Liberal leader March 19.

Paul Martin intends to officially step down as Liberal Leader on March 19 when party executives meet in Ottawa to set a convention date.

The former prime minister has sent a letter of resignation to Liberal Party President Mike Eizenga declaring he will step aside as soon as the party schedules a leadership convention date.

The party's constitution stipulates one must be held within a year of the leader's resignation, which means a convention will be scheduled some time between this weekend and March 19, 2007.

Martin's move douses any speculation he would try to lead the party into the next federal election.

That's not going to help this campaign out much.

Paul Martin to resign March 19

Paul Martin to resign March 19.

Paul Martin intends to officially step down as Liberal Leader on March 19 when party executives meet in Ottawa to set a convention date.

The former prime minister has sent a letter of resignation to Liberal Party President Mike Eizenga declaring he will step aside as soon as the party schedules a leadership convention date.

The party's constitution stipulates one must be held within a year of the leader's resignation, which means a convention will be scheduled some time between this weekend and March 19, 2007.

Martin's move douses any speculation he would try to lead the party into the next federal election.

Paul Martin to resign March 19

Paul Martin to resign March 19.

Paul Martin intends to officially step down as Liberal Leader on March 19 when party executives meet in Ottawa to set a convention date.

The former prime minister has sent a letter of resignation to Liberal Party President Mike Eizenga declaring he will step aside as soon as the party schedules a leadership convention date.

The party's constitution stipulates one must be held within a year of the leader's resignation, which means a convention will be scheduled some time between this weekend and March 19, 2007.

Martin's move douses any speculation he would try to lead the party into the next federal election.

Duties on U.S. Corn

The Canadian Border Services Agency formalized duties of 44 per cent on corn imported from the United States.

OTTAWA—Canadian corn farmers, who say they're fighting for their lives, applauded a ruling yesterday that upholds stiff penalties on imports of U.S. grain corn found to be subsidized and sold below cost.

The Canadian Border Services Agency formalized duties of 44 per cent on corn imported from the United States, concluding it has been subsidized there, then dumped here.

The combined total of the duties, first imposed in December on unprocessed grain corn, are worth $1.65 (U.S.) per bushel.

The decision presents a final opportunity for about 29,000 corn producers, based almost entirely in Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec, to preserve their way of life, said Brian Doidge, general manager of the Ontario Corn Producers' Association.

"What's really at stake is the ability of rural Canada to survive," he said after the ruling.

"The U.S. (agriculture) subsidies have a systemic impact on price ... and it's a long-term erosion of Canadian society in rural Canada that's at risk here," he added.

"What we've decided to do is draw a line in the grain."

What does this have to do with anything?

With new studies revealing pop and other sugar-laden beverages contribute to weight gain, even in toddlers, the image of a pudgy prime minister enjoying a can of ``liquid candy'' may not be sending the right message, say nutritional experts. Dr. Paul Boisvert, co-ordinator for educational activities for the Merck Frosst/Canadian Institutes of Health Research chair in obesity at Laval University, said it's difficult to gauge the prime minister's eating habits and what affect they have on his weight, but that his image could have a negative impact.

``It's not a good example,'' he said.

His job is to govern the country not to be a good eating example.

Wednesday, March 15, 2006

Looks like we'll be stuck with the Wheat Board for a while yet.

Tuesday, March 14, 2006

Isaac Hayes can't take it, goes crying home to mommy

Hayes quits over "repeated religious jokes" Except he was never bothered by the jokes until they were about scientology, suddenly he is upset about the lack of tolerance, and they have gone to far. The Scientology episode was one of the best South Park episodes that I've seen, right up there with the mormon episode they did a couple of years ago. I also don't think that its anything near as offensive as some of the shows that they've done on Jews or Christians.

And it contains what might be the greatest line in South Park history

"Tom Cruise won't come out of the closet."

Tokyo plans on building tower to replace CN as world's tallest tower.

But do not fret Toronto, you'll still likely hold the position as the world's ugliest really tall tower.

Monday, March 13, 2006

Update on the Da Vinci Code lawsuit

Dan Brown comments on the plagarism accusations.

Dan Brown, author of The Da Vinci Code, told a London court Monday he had a 'passion for codes' but rejected as 'completely fanciful' accusations that he 'stole the plot' for his bestselling novel.

The 41-year-old American, who is known to be publicity-shy, spoke for the first time as a witness in the two-week trial involving his book and said he was 'astounded' by the accusations.


Having read both books I tend to agree with Brown on this. There is only a loose connection between the two in that they involve the same basic premise and use many similar arguments.

Both books explore a theory that Jesus did not die on the cross but survived and had children with Mary Magdalene, and that their descendents survive.

Maybe I missed something when I read the Da Vinci Code but I didn't read it that Jesus didn't die on the cross, just that he had children with Mary Magdalene and their descendents still survive.

This post does the same thing in regards to this cartoon that the mainstream media did to the Mohammed cartoons. That is, it refused to show them. This on the grounds of 'disgust' rather than respect for a certain religion, but does it not amount to the same thing? In the end it's a refusal to show something that they disagree with or don't like. Which is certainly within their right to do as part of free speech, but it makes attacking the MSM for not printing the Danish cartoons highly hypocritical in my opinion.

Bush didn't lie about Iraq

Newly translated Iraqi documents from Saddam Hussein's regime show that President Bush was factually accurate when he told the nation in his 2003 State of the Union Address that Iraq had recently sought uranium from Africa.

Bush's 16-word statement had formed the basis for the claim adopted by administration critics that "Bush lied" about Iraq's weapons of mass destruction programs.

But according to the Washington Times today, an unnamed U.S. official reports that "newly translated Iraqi documents . . . tell of Saddam seeking uranium from Africa in the mid-1990s."

Friday, March 10, 2006

March 10, 2006 - We're outside Knoxville, and it's 23 degrees. Unbelievable. "Hope y'all brought yer sun screen, you Canadians!"

Got a call from one the Canadian Press's finest, Mr. Colin Perkel, about the important human rights tribunal ruling issued today.

Here's a paragraph on the facts:

"I. THE COMPLAINT

[1] The complainant, Richard Warman, has filed a complaint alleging that in 2001 and 2002, the respondents, Alexan Kulbashian and James Scott Richardson, communicated messages over the Internet that exposed individuals who are non-Christian, non-Caucasian, or of "other" national ethnic origins, to hatred or contempt, contrary to s. 13 of the Canadian Human Rights Act. In his complaint form, Mr. Warman named three additional respondents, identified as "Tri-City Skins.com", "Canadian Ethnic Cleansing Team (CECT)", and "Affordable Space.com".

And here's a paragraph on the landmark ruling:

"[135] Accordingly, I order Mr. Kulbashian and Mr. Richardson, as well as Affordable Space.com and the Canadian Ethnic Cleansing Team, to cease and desist from communicating or causing to be communicated, by the means described in s. 13 of the Act, namely the Internet, any matter of the type contained in the Hate Messages that is likely to expose a person or persons to hatred or contempt by reason of the fact that the person or persons are identifiable on the basis of a prohibited ground of discrimination."

The financial penalties handed out were puny, but the ruling is historic, I think. Why is it a landmark? Because, as I related to Colin, it effectively refutes the CRTC's cowardly 1998 non-decision that the Internet should be a regulation-free zone, where haters can say whatever they want.

It's also historic because it makes clear that - if an internet service provider is recklessly indifferent to hateful words and images it hosts for others - then it, too, wil be held accountable.

It's about time. The Internet is not unfairly likened to a cyber-sewer - the place where neo-Nazis, stalkers, haters, al-Qaeda, child molesters and violent pornographers have flourished with relative impunity for years. Maybe that will start to change, now. Here's hoping.


Warren Kinsella

Being the rather hardcore supporter of free speech that I am, I dislike decisions such as this and am unconvinced yet that they are either necessary or appropriate.

Tuesday, March 07, 2006

Makes me proud to be a U of S student

The Sheaf is generally a waste of paper anyways from what little of it I've seen.


H/t small dead animals

This sort of thing really represents the mind set of a lot of western "progressives" as they call themselves, who seem to have a systemic loathing of themselves and their culture and history. This self-loathing means that it is exceptable to say anything about Christians that you want because A) they deserve it and B) as the "dominate" group they need to be knocked down so that others can get on top.

As a note, personally, I'm not offended by this cartoon as a cartoon. I don't think it to be all that good, and it certainly fails as a relevent commentary on anything, but it doesn't offend me. That said, it does offend me in the context that they refused to publish the much less offensive Mohammed cartoons "out of respect of Islam," and than turning around an blatantly insulting Jesus for no reason and without even making an actual political point that insults me. The only point that this cartoon makes is that one can say anything you want about Christianity and Christian symbols without causing protests or death threats, but draw a picture of Mohammed...

Update:

I feel I must publicly communicate with our campus community on what I
have just seen in the student newspaper.

In the February 23 edition of the Sheaf, the editors explained that they
would not publish the controversial cartoons of the Prophet Muhammad. It
is surprising that they did not exercise similar restraint in their
decision to publish 'Capitalist Piglet' in the March 2 issue of the
paper. This is a cartoon that is certain to cause distress to members of
our community. It has divisive shock value only and does nothing to
advance the understanding or debate for which universities should be
distinguished.

The Sheaf should apologize to us all.

Peter MacKinnon
President


Update and bumped: The paper apologizes.

Though they still seem to miss the real point of contention.

Indians can't function in normal society

Who's the racist here?

The plot thickens as Income Trust probe continues

An e-mail from Brison tipped investors off?

The Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce has turned over an e-mail received from Liberal MP Scott Brison to police and regulators as part of a probe into the income-trust controversy that dogged the Liberals in the recent election campaign, The Globe and Mail has learned.

Sources said the former public works minister, a potential contender for the Liberal leadership, sent an e-mail to one of CIBC's employees the day before Ottawa announced its much-anticipated policy on income trusts last November, in which he suggested the recipient would likely be pleased by the decision.

The bank did not learn of the e-mail until after the federal election campaign began, but when it did, it launched an internal review of its trading activity in the lead-up to Ottawa's announcement. The sources said the review did not turn up anything unusual, but CIBC still decided to bring its report to the attention of the RCMP and the Ontario Securities Commission.

Trading of income trusts spiked considerably on Nov. 23, the day former finance minister Ralph Goodale unveiled his policy on the booming sector, prompting speculation that there may have been a leak from the federal government.


Steve Janke

Of course, Brison is denying everything, which is bizarre, if only because the email is actual hard evidence. This isn't someone recalling a conversation. This is an email with headers and whatnot. The email was sent on November 22, a suspicious date indeed.

Even if the CIBC did not act on the information, and it insists it did not, the fact is that there is evidence that a senior cabinet minister sent a nudge-nudge-wink-wink email to a financial house about impending tax law changes.

People go to jail over stuff like this.

If the email turns out to be legit, I wonder exactly why Brison knew about the tax decision. I can't see why he should have known. McCallum as revenue minister and Valeri as House Leader made sense. Public works minister? Don't see it. How did he know about the decision? Paul Martin, Ralph Goodale, John McCallum, and Tony Valeri all insist that they confided only in immediate senior staff, and that no one leaked the information any further.

Someone else is lying.

You know what the bizarre thing is? When Parliament resumes sitting, Question Period will make no sense. The Conservatives, as the governing party, will be asked all the questions. But the answers to all the interesting questions still lie with the Liberals.

Useless 'ethics' commissioner on his way out.

Shapiro pretty mush sealed his fate by announcing that he would investigate Emmerson after he didn't investigate Stronach, especially as his position had to be tenuous already considering some of his findings (or more specifically, lack of) during the last Parliament.

Peter Julian, the B.C. New Democrat who asked the commissioner to look into the matter, said he was saddened by the response from the PMO.

"I certainly hope that he'll reconsider his position, that the reaction on the weekend was just a very strong reaction based on partisan motives," Julian told CTV's Canada AM on Monday.

Weren't the NDP highly critical of Shapiro during the last sitting of the house and did Ed Broadbent not say that Shapiro should be fired? Who's the self-serving one here?

Monday, March 06, 2006

No war for Jack

Jack Layton has recently realized that there are Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan and they are actually involved in actual meaningful missions that involve a risk to their lives. As soldiers on meaningful missions that put their lives at risk is unCanadian Jack is demandingthat the government vote to return them to Canada.

Saturday, March 04, 2006

Paul McCartney to the rescue of the seals

Dukes it out with Danny Williams on Larry King Live.

Not that he knows what he's talking about but since when did animal rights activists worry about the facts in their arguments?

Friday, March 03, 2006

How about an investigation into the ethics of the ethics commissioner

There was no investigation when Stronach left when there was a far more blatant conflict of interest, so investigate this one? Surely not because Emmerson switched to the Conservatives, party-hopping for personal gain is okay if you go from Conservative to Liberal but the other way is an entirely different story...

The NDP and Liberals need to get together to stop the Conservatives says former professor.

So what do we do? How do we prevent the Conservatives from forming a majority government? In the best interests of Canada, it's up to progressive-minded citizens to urge the NDP and the Liberals to form a coalition, and eventually, perhaps, a complete merger of the two parties. It's only then the progressive majority in Canada would be in a position to vote for a political entity that would reflect their views, values and interests.

...

A meaningful strategy, equally in the interest of both parties, would be an agreement to run all the incumbent candidates, Liberal and NDP, without opposition from the other party. Such a strategy would guarantee the reelection of every single member - surely this should be an enticement for a coalition! As for the seats held by the Conservatives, party strategists should be able to work out which party would have a better chance of winning, and then run just one candidate for that particular party. Such a maneuver would wipe out a great many Conservatives everywhere, except in Alberta, although, even there, they should lose some seats in Edmonton. Obviously, this would be a winning formula for a substantial majority government.

Wednesday, March 01, 2006

So much for the Afghanistan trip?